Tuesday, March 18, 2008

bad water is very, very bad

This image just absolutely shocked me.


I've always thought shock tactics were a bit cheap, but this is an incredibly powerful way to put the message in context. Wow. Have you ever thought about water in that way before?

I think the strings holding up the planes make the image even more striking. They add a childishness to it and an element of craft that somehow wasn't necessary. It makes the message even more deliberate somehow, as though the people behind the message are saying: "That's right, we thought about it, and this is exactly what we are saying to you."

Found here via ffffound

On a side note, I've witnessed several examples of 9/11 being 'exploited' in recent months: In a short comedy play, in the TV show Skins and now here. I guess we've passed the threshold?

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4 Comments:

Anonymous lauren said...

and everytime we buy bottled water, we contribute to the problem. which is why i suggested that you should vote for innocent and against spring water in the ultimate beverage bracket on marcus brown's kaiser edition.

http://www.thekaiser-edition.com/archives/2008/03/17/the-ultimate-beverage-bracket-round-1-week-2/

sorry for the spam andy. the ad is amazing. and one i wish would get some serious attention (as opposed to an ad about chocolate by an ape).

8:54 am  
Blogger Andy Whitlock said...

Thanks Lauren. It's a powerful concept. Sadly it falls down in the way most ATL advertising does. Despite engaging the reader it doesn't invoke action. A URL at the bottom won't cut it.
Your anti-spring-water post stands more chance of affecting behaviour.

In fact, I stopped buying bottled water last year after reading some stats in the Guardian. Their figures caused me to imagine a squadron of planes full of bottled water flying half way across the world for us to guzzle. It's all a bit crazy.

9:13 am  
Anonymous Aaron said...

I have really mixed feelings, mainly, I think, from seeing a lot of these ads over at Copyranter. He generally gives them short shrift.

Yes, the problem being highlighted is one that deserves our attention but I generally find shock tactics an ultimately self-defeating approach. We are given a brief jolt out of our collective slumber, and . . . that's about it.

9:17 am  
Blogger Andy Whitlock said...

This is the thing really. 'Jolting' vs 'rethinking'
A pin on my chair will make me jump up. An enticing destination will cause me to walk somewhere new.

I have no problem with a jolt as long as once I'm on my feet there is something meaningful for me to engage with. But as you say, the jolt is not the solution.

9:24 am  

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